All posts filed under: Gender Equality

Gender Equality Series #2: WW Allies

This is the second article of the Gender Equality Series. If you haven’t seen our first one, check it out here! This week, The Walnut Street Journal met with Victoria Yuan, a co-director of Wharton Women Allies, which is Wharton Women’s new initiative aimed at bringing men into the conversation about gender equality. We spoke with her about the club, its future, and gender inequality in the workplace. WW: What was the inspiration behind starting Wharton Women Allies? Victoria: So I actually discussed the topic with the Wharton Women President, Audrey Goldberg, and we asked ourselves “Why do we need a special organization to get us to the same level as the guys?” We realized that to change things we needed to get to the root of the problem: inequality in the workplace. For example, where I interned last summer, three quarters of the employees were men. It’s not just about discrimination, but also about different communication styles across genders, different interests, etc. We therefore started to think about how to address this and what everyone …

Gender Equality Series #1: Wharton 22’s

The Women In The Workplace 2017 study by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company reveals a few striking facts: only 1 in 5 C-suite leaders is a woman and fewer than 1 in 30 is a woman of color. Although these statistics may be surprising, they reveal the truth about the lack of diversity and gender equality in the workplace. “Blind spots” often exist as many employees do not realize how underrepresented women are, while unconscious biases towards women are similarly prevalent and occur automatically. As a result, it becomes difficult to solve an issue that is not deeply understood or acknowledged. At the same time, such biases are not restricted to the workplace: in fact, gender biases also exist in business school and even in industries beyond the business world. For example, women in traditionally male-dominated fields such as medicine and law often similarly experience gender biases and witness the unquestioned acceptance that follows. While men may not realize that these gender biases in the workplace are a frequent problem, an organization here at Wharton …