All posts filed under: Career

Venture Capital Series #3: So, How Do I Get Involved?

During the course of the semester, we have posted about Venture Capital, its culture, and advice from successful alums in the industry. Our guess is that at this point you might be wondering how to learn more as a student and get involved in the industry. At Wharton, Vice Dean Lori Rosenkopf has taken the initiative to bring tech and Venture Capital knowledge to students through two specific channels: “Culture and Institutions of the Tech Sector: Bridging Research and Practice” (MGMT 265): offered every fall “The best part about the MGMT 265 class is that you can ask questions and make meaningful connections directly with alums in the tech sector.” – Eugenia Carmona (W’20) This half-credit course teaches students about the “people, practices, and organizations” of the tech culture. During each class, students videochat with an alumni from the tech sector and integrate primary and secondary sources to learn more about venture development, serial entrepreneurship, product-market fit, and accelerators. Other exciting topics covered this semester included an analysis of IPOs vs. M&A as methods for financing, …

Venture Capital Series #2: Alumni in VC

As part of our Venture Capital Series (check out post #1 here!), Wharton Women interviewed two Wharton graduates who dared to follow a different career path and are now at the top of the game in the venture capital industry.   Ramya Varma Ramya is an investor at Advantage Capital, where she deploys seed through growth-stage equity capital toward high-growth, US-based businesses that significantly impact on their communities.   WW: You have extensive background in venture capital, specifically in the media, information and telecommunications industries. Why did you decide to switch to impact investing and how is it different from your previous experiences? Ramya: I spent a long time in traditional middle-market private equity, but when I went back to school to get my MBA at Wharton, I wanted to learn about early-stage companies, not necessarily focused on impact. Advantage Capital had done an investment together with the fund where I previously worked, so I applied and eventually started working there. Advantage is not specifically focused on social ventures, but on areas that are underserved …

Venture Capital Series #1: A Snapshot

In this series, Wharton Women sheds light on a less-explored but fascinating industry and career path. This is the first article of a three-part series on Venture Capital. As Penn students, we oftentimes feel overwhelmed with opportunities in the banking and consulting sectors. There is an indirect push to follow in the steps of recent graduates by earning the highest possible starting salaries and living in New York. The adventurous few might even consider marketing, government or technology jobs, but we often overlook the possibilities that lie outside these traditional career paths. Venture Capital firms are dedicated to providing a form of financing to small, early-stage firms with high growth potential. In other words, it is a form of private equity. Their processes are focused on conducting due diligences, creating accelerator programs, sourcing investors, and selecting the right firms to invest in. However, beyond the technical aspects of VC, it is particularly interesting to consider the culture of innovation and creativity that reigns in the industry. Since VCs are generally quite small and often focused …