Month: December 2017

Venture Capital Series #3: So, How Do I Get Involved?

During the course of the semester, we have posted about Venture Capital, its culture, and advice from successful alums in the industry. Our guess is that at this point you might be wondering how to learn more as a student and get involved in the industry. At Wharton, Vice Dean Lori Rosenkopf has taken the initiative to bring tech and Venture Capital knowledge to students through two specific channels: “Culture and Institutions of the Tech Sector: Bridging Research and Practice” (MGMT 265): offered every fall “The best part about the MGMT 265 class is that you can ask questions and make meaningful connections directly with alums in the tech sector.” – Eugenia Carmona (W’20) This half-credit course teaches students about the “people, practices, and organizations” of the tech culture. During each class, students videochat with an alumni from the tech sector and integrate primary and secondary sources to learn more about venture development, serial entrepreneurship, product-market fit, and accelerators. Other exciting topics covered this semester included an analysis of IPOs vs. M&A as methods for financing, …

Gender Equality Series #2: WW Allies

This is the second article of the Gender Equality Series. If you haven’t seen our first one, check it out here! This week, The Walnut Street Journal met with Victoria Yuan, a co-director of Wharton Women Allies, which is Wharton Women’s new initiative aimed at bringing men into the conversation about gender equality. We spoke with her about the club, its future, and gender inequality in the workplace. WW: What was the inspiration behind starting Wharton Women Allies? Victoria: So I actually discussed the topic with the Wharton Women President, Audrey Goldberg, and we asked ourselves “Why do we need a special organization to get us to the same level as the guys?” We realized that to change things we needed to get to the root of the problem: inequality in the workplace. For example, where I interned last summer, three quarters of the employees were men. It’s not just about discrimination, but also about different communication styles across genders, different interests, etc. We therefore started to think about how to address this and what everyone …