Month: November 2017

Venture Capital Series #2: Alumni in VC

As part of our Venture Capital Series (check out post #1 here!), Wharton Women interviewed two Wharton graduates who dared to follow a different career path and are now at the top of the game in the venture capital industry.   Ramya Varma Ramya is an investor at Advantage Capital, where she deploys seed through growth-stage equity capital toward high-growth, US-based businesses that significantly impact on their communities.   WW: You have extensive background in venture capital, specifically in the media, information and telecommunications industries. Why did you decide to switch to impact investing and how is it different from your previous experiences? Ramya: I spent a long time in traditional middle-market private equity, but when I went back to school to get my MBA at Wharton, I wanted to learn about early-stage companies, not necessarily focused on impact. Advantage Capital had done an investment together with the fund where I previously worked, so I applied and eventually started working there. Advantage is not specifically focused on social ventures, but on areas that are underserved …

Gender Equality Series #1: Wharton 22’s

The Women In The Workplace 2017 study by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company reveals a few striking facts: only 1 in 5 C-suite leaders is a woman and fewer than 1 in 30 is a woman of color. Although these statistics may be surprising, they reveal the truth about the lack of diversity and gender equality in the workplace. “Blind spots” often exist as many employees do not realize how underrepresented women are, while unconscious biases towards women are similarly prevalent and occur automatically. As a result, it becomes difficult to solve an issue that is not deeply understood or acknowledged. At the same time, such biases are not restricted to the workplace: in fact, gender biases also exist in business school and even in industries beyond the business world. For example, women in traditionally male-dominated fields such as medicine and law often similarly experience gender biases and witness the unquestioned acceptance that follows. While men may not realize that these gender biases in the workplace are a frequent problem, an organization here at Wharton …