Year: 2017

Venture Capital Series #3: So, How Do I Get Involved?

During the course of the semester, we have posted about Venture Capital, its culture, and advice from successful alums in the industry. Our guess is that at this point you might be wondering how to learn more as a student and get involved in the industry. At Wharton, Vice Dean Lori Rosenkopf has taken the initiative to bring tech and Venture Capital knowledge to students through two specific channels: “Culture and Institutions of the Tech Sector: Bridging Research and Practice” (MGMT 265): offered every fall “The best part about the MGMT 265 class is that you can ask questions and make meaningful connections directly with alums in the tech sector.” – Eugenia Carmona (W’20) This half-credit course teaches students about the “people, practices, and organizations” of the tech culture. During each class, students videochat with an alumni from the tech sector and integrate primary and secondary sources to learn more about venture development, serial entrepreneurship, product-market fit, and accelerators. Other exciting topics covered this semester included an analysis of IPOs vs. M&A as methods for financing, …

Gender Equality Series #2: WW Allies

This is the second article of the Gender Equality Series. If you haven’t seen our first one, check it out here! This week, The Walnut Street Journal met with Victoria Yuan, a co-director of Wharton Women Allies, which is Wharton Women’s new initiative aimed at bringing men into the conversation about gender equality. We spoke with her about the club, its future, and gender inequality in the workplace. WW: What was the inspiration behind starting Wharton Women Allies? Victoria: So I actually discussed the topic with the Wharton Women President, Audrey Goldberg, and we asked ourselves “Why do we need a special organization to get us to the same level as the guys?” We realized that to change things we needed to get to the root of the problem: inequality in the workplace. For example, where I interned last summer, three quarters of the employees were men. It’s not just about discrimination, but also about different communication styles across genders, different interests, etc. We therefore started to think about how to address this and what everyone …

Venture Capital Series #2: Alumni in VC

As part of our Venture Capital Series (check out post #1 here!), Wharton Women interviewed two Wharton graduates who dared to follow a different career path and are now at the top of the game in the venture capital industry.   Ramya Varma Ramya is an investor at Advantage Capital, where she deploys seed through growth-stage equity capital toward high-growth, US-based businesses that significantly impact on their communities.   WW: You have extensive background in venture capital, specifically in the media, information and telecommunications industries. Why did you decide to switch to impact investing and how is it different from your previous experiences? Ramya: I spent a long time in traditional middle-market private equity, but when I went back to school to get my MBA at Wharton, I wanted to learn about early-stage companies, not necessarily focused on impact. Advantage Capital had done an investment together with the fund where I previously worked, so I applied and eventually started working there. Advantage is not specifically focused on social ventures, but on areas that are underserved …

Gender Equality Series #1: Wharton 22’s

The Women In The Workplace 2017 study by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company reveals a few striking facts: only 1 in 5 C-suite leaders is a woman and fewer than 1 in 30 is a woman of color. Although these statistics may be surprising, they reveal the truth about the lack of diversity and gender equality in the workplace. “Blind spots” often exist as many employees do not realize how underrepresented women are, while unconscious biases towards women are similarly prevalent and occur automatically. As a result, it becomes difficult to solve an issue that is not deeply understood or acknowledged. At the same time, such biases are not restricted to the workplace: in fact, gender biases also exist in business school and even in industries beyond the business world. For example, women in traditionally male-dominated fields such as medicine and law often similarly experience gender biases and witness the unquestioned acceptance that follows. While men may not realize that these gender biases in the workplace are a frequent problem, an organization here at Wharton …

Venture Capital Series #1: A Snapshot

In this series, Wharton Women sheds light on a less-explored but fascinating industry and career path. This is the first article of a three-part series on Venture Capital. As Penn students, we oftentimes feel overwhelmed with opportunities in the banking and consulting sectors. There is an indirect push to follow in the steps of recent graduates by earning the highest possible starting salaries and living in New York. The adventurous few might even consider marketing, government or technology jobs, but we often overlook the possibilities that lie outside these traditional career paths. Venture Capital firms are dedicated to providing a form of financing to small, early-stage firms with high growth potential. In other words, it is a form of private equity. Their processes are focused on conducting due diligences, creating accelerator programs, sourcing investors, and selecting the right firms to invest in. However, beyond the technical aspects of VC, it is particularly interesting to consider the culture of innovation and creativity that reigns in the industry. Since VCs are generally quite small and often focused …

Annual Dinner 2017

Wharton Women’s 2017 Annual Dinner was a huge success! This event takes place every year in the fall, and the 2017 event theme was Explore. On September 13, Wharton Women members gathered at the Inn at Penn for a Career Fair and a three-course meal. The highlight of the event was Michelle Peluso’s keynote speech during the dinner portion of the event. Michelle Peluso attended Wharton as an undergrad and was very proud to be a Wharton Woman. She has had an amazing career—she started out at BCG, launched her own company, and now serves as the CMO of IBM. In addition to being an amazing woman in top business leadership positions, she also prioritizes family and loves being the mom of her two kids. Michelle was an absolute inspiration and gave us four ways we can “Explore” as we launch our careers and go through different situations in life. Here are some key takeaways from her talk: Explore Learning: It’s great to step outside our comfort zones and learn from uncomfortable situations. We will only grow …

Summer Recap 2017

Wharton Women have been up to incredible things during the summer of 2017! Keep reading to find out, in their own words, what they accomplished in their time away from Penn: Class of 2018 Business Analytics (The Hershey Company): Carson Miller, Hershey, PA This summer I was lucky enough to be able to intern at the sweetest place on earth, The Hershey Company. At Hershey I worked on the business intelligence and analytics team where I was able to learn a tremendous amount about how data can be used to drive business decisions. It was a great hands on experience where I was able to develop a new set of technical skills in building an application for my team to use. Being at a CPG company was an amazing experience and I loved being able to work with such tangible and lovable products. Having the opportunity to learn more about how technology can intersect with businesses gave me a lot to think about in how I can approach future situations when in the workplace. Sports Business …

Etiquette Dinner 2017

“Trust your gut. Don’t do anything that doesn’t feel right”   – Kelly Meerbott On April 6th, 2017, one hundred undergraduates gathered in Center City at Estia Restaurant for the annual Wharton Women Etiquette Dinner. As the tables filled and conversation buzzed, a feeling of excitement was in the air. Everyone was eager to learn more about this year’s theme: Unspoken Rules in Business. While enjoying a three-course Greek meal, attendees had the opportunity to hear from executive leadership coach and special keynote speaker, Kelly Meerbott.

Senior Spotlight: Allyson Ahlstrom

“It’s a simple thing: when we put on clothes we like, we feel good… When we put on an outfit we love, we feel empowered” Allyson Ahlstrom, a senior in Wharton studying Real Estate and Finance, is far from being just another college student. Not only does she juggle classes, extracurriculars, and social activities like the rest of us, she also devotes a significant amount of her time to developing Threads for Teens, a non-profit organization that she founded seven years ago. At age 14, a time when most teenagers are busy navigating the beginning of high school, Allyson was inspired to help her community after reading the book Generation Change. A few days later, a full idea came together with a logo and a name: Threads for Teens would provide deserving girls in need with brand-new head-to-toe outfits.

WWBC 2017: Breaking Barriers

Wharton Women powerfully entered the new year with the annual Wharton Women Business Conference on January 24, 2017. This conference was held on the 8th floor of Huntsman Hall and centered around the theme of “Breaking Barriers.” At the conference, keynote speakers Kat Cole and Erika Karp told personal stories and lessons and empowered us to be bold in launching our careers. We also enjoyed hearing an inspiring panel session with Wharton Professor Katherine Milkman, Johnson & Johnson professional Aileen Stockburger, and young entrepreneur Caroline Beckman.